LBRY with Jeremy Kauffman – Episode 109

Content discovery and delivery and how it works in the digital realm is one of the most critical pieces of our modern economy. The blockchain is one of the most disruptive and transformative technologies to arrive in recent years. This week Jeremy Kauffman explains how the company and platform of LBRY are combining the two in an attempt to redefine how content creators and consumers interact by creating a new distributed marketplace for all kinds of media.

Python Goes To The Movies with Dhruv Govil – Episode 108

Movies are magic, and Python is part of what makes that magic possible. We go behind the curtain this week with Dhruv Govil to learn about how Python gets used to bring a movie from concept to completion. He shares the story of how he got started in film, the tools that he uses day to day, and some resources for further learning.

Scapy with Guillaume Valadon – Episode 107

Network protocols are often inscrutable, but if you have an effective way to experiment with them then they expose a lot of power. This week Guillaume Valadon explains how Scapy can be used to inspect your network traffic, test the security of your systems, and develop brand new protocols, all in Python!

yt-project with Nathan Goldbaum and John Zuhone – Episode 106

Astrophysics and cosmology are fields that require working with complex multidimensional data to simulate the workings of our universe. The yt project was created to make working with this data and providing useful visualizations easy and fun. This week Nathan Goldbaum and John Zuhone share the story of how yt got started, how it works, and how it is being used right now.

Scikit-Image with Stefan van der Walt and Juan Nunez-Iglesias – Episode 105

Computer vision is a complex field that spans industries with varying needs and implementations. Scikit-Image is a library that provides tools and techniques for people working in the sciences to process the visual data that is critical to their research. This week Stefan Van der Walt and Juan Nunez-Iglesias, co-authors of Elegant SciPy, talk about how the project got started, how it works, and how they are using it to power their experiments.

Oscar Ecommerce with David Winterbottom and Michael van Tellingen – Episode 104

If you have a product to sell, whether it is a physical good or a subscription service, then you need a way to manage your transactions. The Oscar ecommerce framework for Django is a flexible, extensible, and well built way for you to add that functionality to your website. This week David Winterbottom and Michael van Tellingen talk about how the project got started, how it works under the covers, and how you can start using it today.

Duplicity with Kenneth Loafman – Episode 103

Everyone who uses a computer on a regular basis knows the importance of backups. Duplicity is one of the most widely used backup technologies, and it’s written in Python! This week Kenneth Loafman shares how Duplicity got started, how it works, and why you should be using it every day.

Digital Identity, Privacy, and Security with Brian Warner – Episode 102

As the internet and digital technologies continue to infiltrate our way of life, we are forced to consider how our concepts of identity and security are reflected in these spaces. Brian Warner joins me this week to discuss his work on privacy focused projects that he has worked on, including the Tahoe LAFS, Firefox Sync, and Magic Wormhole. He also has some intriguing ideas about how we can replace passwords and what it means to have an online identity.

Crossbar.io with Tobias Oberstein and Alexander Gödde – Episode 101

As our system architectures and the Internet of Things continue to push us towards distributed logic we need a way to route the traffic between those various components. Crossbar.io is the original implementation of the Web Application Messaging Protocol (WAMP) which combines Remote Procedure Calls (RPC) with Publish/Subscribe (PubSub) communication patterns into a single communication layer. In this episode Tobias Oberstein describes the use cases and design patterns that become possible when you have event-based RPC in a high-throughput and low-latency system.